2 Thessalonians 2

2 Thessalonians 2: Apostasy

                Paul warns the Thessalonians and everyone reading his letter then and today about Apostasy. Paul was concerned that many people were being taught falsehoods, by false teachers.

“Let no man deceive you by any means: for that day shall not come, except there come a falling away first…” (2 Thessalonians 2:3)

                Essentially before Jesus Christ can come for a second time, there WILL be a falling away from His Gospel. The time when there exists no proper Authority on the earth is known as an Apostasy. After the death of Jesus Christ, His Apostles ran the Church of Jesus Christ until all of them were persecuted and finally killed. The Power and Authority that had been given to them died with them.

Acts 25

Acts 25: Paul Appeals unto Caesar

When Felix is replaced by Festus, Paul’s Jewish accusers decide to re-try the case against Paul. Paul asks Festus to appeal unto Caesar; “…I stand at Caesar’s judgment seat, where I ought to be judged: to the Jews have I done no wrong, as thou very well knowest.” (Acts 25:10) Festus explains the case involving Paul to the visiting King Agrippa. Shortly after, the trial begins, and Festus makes an opening speech explaining the situation of the Jews desiring his death and Festus explains that the Jews made warrantless claims and false accusations with no evidence against Paul. Festus explained that this was contrary to Roman Law, explaining; “…It is not the manners of the Romans to deliver any man to die, before that he which is accused have the accusers face to face, and have licence to answer for himself concerning the crime laid against him.” (Acts 25:16) Festus desired that King Agrippa hear from Paul himself, and he agrees.

Acts 24

Acts 24: Paul is accused and bound

Ananias the high priest and an orator named Tertullus make accusations toward Paul. Paul is accused of profaning the temple and sedition. Paul declares that there are no witnesses or evidences to support their claims or accusations during his visits to the temple. Felix (the governor of Judea) defers a decision, later taking his Jewish wife Drusilla to hear Paul speak of Christ. Felix hoped that Paul would bribe him to be released.

Acts 6

Acts 6: The Apostles Chose 7 Others

                The number of disciples of the Lord (followers of Christ) multiplied and as the Church grew, some complained that the distributions [the money and goods] were not being handled properly. So Peter and John ask the disciples to give them some names of good men, honest men who they could call and appoint over that duty, so that they might go on teaching about Jesus Christ and Administering in His Church.

                Peter and John call; Stephen, Phillip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas and Nicolas to have the delegation of duties regarding the distribution of the wealth of the Church. These men were set before the Apostles “…and when they had prayed, they laid their hands on them.” (Acts 6:6) Here we see that the Power and Authority was given to these men in the same manner that Peter and John had received their Authority from Jesus Christ, meaning that the Authority must come in this manner.

                From this point on… the Church grew and multiplied in Jerusalem. Stephen did man miracles and even preached the Gospel. However, a group called the ‘Libertines’ [Freed-Men] sought to destroy Stephen, because they believe he spoke blasphemies against Moses and against God, because they did not believe in Jesus Christ. The group “…set up false witnesses. Which said, This man ceaseth not to speak blasphemous words against this holy place, and the law:” (Acts 6:13) The council that was over seeing this “trial” could only see Stephen as an angel. Essentially the council could not see the evil that he supposedly had in him.