Summary of Luke

Summary of Luke

Like the books of Matthew and Mark, we learn from the Book of Luke the stories of the birth of Jesus Christ and John the Baptist. Luke tells us that the angel Gabriel appears to Zechariah, telling him that his wife Elizabeth, formerly barren, is pregnant. Soon afterward, Gabriel appears to Elizabeth’s relative, the Virgin Mary, telling her that she too is going to give birth to a child by the Power of the Holy Ghost.

Mary and Joseph travel from their home in Nazareth to Bethlehem to pay taxes to Herod, it is in Bethlehem, in a manger, Jesus is born. Later in a younger age, Jesus was found instructing older men of great wisdom in the temple. Once Jesus grows to the age of about 30, He is baptized in the desert of Judea by John the Baptist.  John is soon imprisoned by Herod, the ruler of the northern Galilee region.

We learn of Jesus’s genealogy, stretching back to the first man, Adam, who is said to be “… the son of God.” (Luke 3:38). We are told of Satan unsuccessfully testing Jesus for forty days in the wilderness. Upon returning from being tempted in the wilderness, Jesus begins his ministry. He is rejected in his hometown of Nazareth and takes to wandering throughout Galilee, where he works many miracles, including casting out devils.

•    In Chapters 1-4: Luke writes a very detailed account of the birth of Jesus, a common Christmas story, yet always fascinating. He then explains John the Baptist’s preparation for the coming Messiah and the baptism of Jesus Christ.

•    In Chapters 5-21: We learn of the ministry of Jesus. As Jesus travels, He teaches, preaches, heals the sick, and brings hope to the desperate and discouraged. He was also seeking those who were obedient and faithful, such as the Roman Centurion who sincerely pleads with Jesus to heal his servant from a far distance, “…say in a word, and my servant shall be healed.” (Luke 7:7). Jesus met many religious leaders who relentlessly opposed Him and constantly tried to trick and kill Him.

•    In Chapters 22-24: Jesus is betrayed by one of His own (Judas). He was unlawfully convicted by a dishonest and hateful court, and sentenced to crucifixion. However, death could not hold Him and after three days He resurrected and arose from the grave, just as He had miraculously raised others during His ministry.

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Luke 1

Luke 1: John the Baptist

                This chapter or ‘account’ was written to Theophilus (which means ‘Friend of God’) Because of the use “…most excellent…” (Luke 1:3), Theophilus seems to be an actual personage.;

In the days of Herod, who was the King of Judaea, a priest named Zacharias had a wife [Elisabeth], who was barren. While attending to his duties in the temple, Zacharias had an angel appear before him and speak to him; “…Fear not, Zacharias; for thy prayer is heard; and thy wife Elisabeth shall bear thee a son, and thou shalt call his name John [John the Baptist].” (Luke 1:13) The angel assures Zacharias that his son will bring him great joy and “…he shall be great in the sight of the Lord, and shall drink neither wine nor strong drink; and he shall be filled with the Holy Ghost, even from his mother’s womb.” (Luke 1:15) Why would John the Baptist be great in the sight of the Lord? Because he was pre-ordained to do so. Because of his calling and the ability to keep the presence of the Holy Ghost he would not drink wine or strong drink, why? Because these substances would only cloud his ability to feel the spirit of the Lord.

Zacharias explains to the angel that he is an old man and his wife is “…well stricken in years.” (Luke 1:18). The angel introduces himself as Gabriel and assures Zacharias that this will come to pass, but Gabriel tells Zacharias that he will not be able to speak until the day of his son’s birth. Months go by and Elisabeth conceives a son.

The angel Gabriel then goes to the city of Galilee, named Nazareth and appears to the virgin Mary, telling her that she will bear a son and his name shall be Jesus, who will “…be called the Son of the Highest” (Luke 1:32). Mary visits Elisabeth (who are cousins), Mary is perplexed because she has not known a single man (meaning she is a virgin), yet she is now pregnant. Elisabeth is filled with the Holy Ghost and tells Mary; “…Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb.” (Luke 1:42)

After John was born, eight days later they came to circumcise the baby and called him ‘Zacharias’, but both Zacharias and Elisabeth refused and said that the child would be called ‘John’ and being filled with the Holy Ghost, Zacharias proclaims that his son shall be called; “…the prophet of the Highest: for thou shalt go before the face of the Lord to prepare his ways; To give knowledge of salvation unto his people by the remission of their sins. Through the tender mercy of our God… To give light to them that sit in darkness…” (Luke 1:76-79)

We end by learning about John the Baptist and how he “…grew, and waxed strong in spirit, and was in the deserts till the day of his shewing unto Israel.” (Luke 1:80)

Daniel 9-10

Daniel 9-10

Scripture Thought (What I Learned):

I learned two VERY important principles from Daniel 9-10. First in Daniel chapter 9, I learned that bad things happen to us, because we need to learn from those experiences to help us change our evil ways. It is like an alcoholic who gets a DUI and spends time in jail… that might make that person change. God does the same thing, if his people misbehave, bad things will happen until they turn from those evils and walk in his path.

The second thing I learned was that the moment we decide to not do evil and follow in God’s commandments, that is the same day he will listen to us and help us! “…for from the first day that thou didst set thine heart to understanding… thy words were heard…” (Daniel 10:12)

Chapter 9: Daniel prays for Israel

Daniel fasts, confesses and prays for all Israel, confessing the sins of the people. Daniel knows from Jeremiah that the Babylonian exile will last seventy years. The curses in the Law of Moses (towards the end of Deuteronomy) have come to pass. Daniel asks that God forgive and restore Jerusalem.

“…all this evil is come upon us… that we might turn from our iniquities, and understand thy truth.” (Daniel 9:13) Essentially, when we ask God, ‘why did this have to happen?’ we need to ask ourselves, what did we do to bring this upon ourselves?

As he prays, Daniel is visited by Gabriel. Gabriel says that in seventy weeks (meaning seventy sets of seven years, ie, 490 years), reconciliation will be made for iniquity, everlasting righteousness will be brought in, and the Most Holy anointed. From the command to restore Jerusalem to the coming of the Messiah, there will be seven weeks and sixty weeks ((7+62) x 7 years = 483 years). The Messiah will be cut off, but for the sake of others, not for himself. This is when Jesus will come and be crucified, so that he can atone for our sins through his blood. The people of the prince who is to come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary. There will be a flood, and desolations are determined until the end of the war. The coming prince will make a covenant with Israel for the final unit of seven years, completing the seventy weeks prophesied for the Jewish people and Jerusalem. The covenant will be broken in the middle of this final seven year period. On the wing of abominations shall be one who makes desolate, until the consummation is determined.

Chapter 10: Daniel sees the Lord

Daniel sees the Lord and others in a glorious vision. Daniel’s vision occurs in the third year of Cyrus’ reign. Daniel has been mourning for three weeks on the banks of the Tigris, Daniel sees a glorious man clothed in linen, girded with a golden belt; his face was like lightning, his eyes like torches of fire, his arms and feet were like burnished bronze, and his voice like that of a multitude. Daniel’s companions do not see the vision – but they are terrified nonetheless, and flee. The glorious man says he has faced opposition from the prince of the kingdom of Persia, and was helped by the prince Michael. Daniel feels overwhelmed by weakness, but is reassured and told to be strong. The glorious person says he must fight the prince of Persia and then the prince of Greece. Michael assists him. He has confirmed and strengthened Darius.