Summary of Luke

Summary of Luke

Like the books of Matthew and Mark, we learn from the Book of Luke the stories of the birth of Jesus Christ and John the Baptist. Luke tells us that the angel Gabriel appears to Zechariah, telling him that his wife Elizabeth, formerly barren, is pregnant. Soon afterward, Gabriel appears to Elizabeth’s relative, the Virgin Mary, telling her that she too is going to give birth to a child by the Power of the Holy Ghost.

Mary and Joseph travel from their home in Nazareth to Bethlehem to pay taxes to Herod, it is in Bethlehem, in a manger, Jesus is born. Later in a younger age, Jesus was found instructing older men of great wisdom in the temple. Once Jesus grows to the age of about 30, He is baptized in the desert of Judea by John the Baptist.  John is soon imprisoned by Herod, the ruler of the northern Galilee region.

We learn of Jesus’s genealogy, stretching back to the first man, Adam, who is said to be “… the son of God.” (Luke 3:38). We are told of Satan unsuccessfully testing Jesus for forty days in the wilderness. Upon returning from being tempted in the wilderness, Jesus begins his ministry. He is rejected in his hometown of Nazareth and takes to wandering throughout Galilee, where he works many miracles, including casting out devils.

•    In Chapters 1-4: Luke writes a very detailed account of the birth of Jesus, a common Christmas story, yet always fascinating. He then explains John the Baptist’s preparation for the coming Messiah and the baptism of Jesus Christ.

•    In Chapters 5-21: We learn of the ministry of Jesus. As Jesus travels, He teaches, preaches, heals the sick, and brings hope to the desperate and discouraged. He was also seeking those who were obedient and faithful, such as the Roman Centurion who sincerely pleads with Jesus to heal his servant from a far distance, “…say in a word, and my servant shall be healed.” (Luke 7:7). Jesus met many religious leaders who relentlessly opposed Him and constantly tried to trick and kill Him.

•    In Chapters 22-24: Jesus is betrayed by one of His own (Judas). He was unlawfully convicted by a dishonest and hateful court, and sentenced to crucifixion. However, death could not hold Him and after three days He resurrected and arose from the grave, just as He had miraculously raised others during His ministry.

Luke 24

Luke 24: He Lives!

                Early in the morning days after the death of Jesus Christ, some of His followers (including Mary Magdelene, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James) came to His sepulchre [tomb] to anoint Him with spices. Upon approaching the tomb, they found the stone, which sealed the tomb was rolled back and when they went in, they did not find the body of Jesus Christ. The followers were confused, but they found two men who were wearing shining garments, who told them; “…Why seek ye the living among the dead? He is not here, but is risen…” (Luke 24:5-6) The two men [or angels] reminded the followers that Jesus had told them exactly what would happen; “…The Son of man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and the third day rise again.” (Luke 24:7)

When the followers heard these words, they remembered. The followers left to tell the Eleven Apostles, but the Apostles thought they were listening to idle tales, and did not believe. Peter ran to the tomb to see for himself; but departed wondering what would happen.

Later, on the way down to a village named Emmaus two of the Apostles walked while discussing the things that had happened. While walking a man approached them and began to speak to them, this man was Jesus Christ, but the two Apostles did not know Him. Jesus asks them why they are sad, and what the reason is for their communication. The two Apostles are flabbergasted as to why this ‘man’ would ask them these questions, they begin to tell Him about the ministry of Jesus and how He was crucified. Jesus responds; “…O fools, and slow of heart to believe… Ought not Christ to have suffered these things…” (Luke 24:25-26) Jesus explains that He has further to walk, but with the evening approaching, the two Apostles invite this ‘man’ to stay with them for the night. While with them, He breaks bread and communes with them, after He is done breaking bread, he disappeared. Upon realizing that the ‘man’ who was with them was Jesus and He had now left after breaking bread with them, they were perplexed; “…Did not our heart burn within us while he talked with us by the way, and while he opened t us the scriptures?” (Luke 24:32) Essentially the two Apostles were upset that they were so blind to not even see Jesus!

The two Apostles return to Jerusalem and proclaim to the other Apostles that Jesus had indeed Risen! While they were speaking, Jesus enters and says to them; “…Peace be unto you. But they were terrified and affrighted, and supposed that they had seen a spirit. And he said unto them, Why are ye troubled? And why do thoughts arise in your hearts? Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself: handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have.” (Luke 24:39) While the Apostles were in shock and were wondering what they had just seen, Jesus asks them; “…Have ye here any meat? And they gave him a piece of a broiled fish, and of an honeycomb. And he took it, and did eat before them.” (Luke 24:41-43)

Here is an important Doctrinal Truth: Jesus Christ has a glorified body of flesh and bones, just like we have as humans. Jesus told His Apostles to touch Him for He had flesh and bones, and He even asked them for food, so that He could eat. Jesus then “…opened… their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures… Thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day… that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. And ye are witnesses of these things.” (Luke 24:45-48) Jesus opens their understanding, so that the Apostles and all those who follow Him can understand the scriptures and know the truth. Jesus had told the people He would be persecuted to death and rise again on the third day, but even then when it happens the Apostles did not believe Him. Jesus explains that His death had to happen, in order to open the door to a remission of sins and the start of missionary work throughout the world, starting in Jerusalem.

Jesus died for ALL of us, that we might be saved. In order to be truly saved, we must follow Jesus, and all His teachings. We cannot follow Him, if we do not follow His commandments and teachings. Jesus is lifted up into heaven and the Apostles rejoiced and worshipped Him in the temple.

Luke 21

Luke 21: The End of the World

                Jesus saw the rich men casting their gifts into the treasury of the Temple, He also saw an old lady who cast in two mites. Jesus then tells those around Him that the old widow had donated more into the treasury then all the rich, because she had given everything she had!

Jesus then explains that Jerusalem and the Temple would soon be destroyed. Those who followed Him, asked Him when this might be. Jesus tells them; “…the time draweth near…when ye shall hear of wars and commotions, be not terrified; for these things must first come to pass… nation shall rise against nation… great earthquakes…famines… pestilences… they shall… persecute you…for my name’s sake.” (Luke 21:8-12)

                Jesus explains that the signs of the Second Coming will be when we hear of wars and see great natural disasters and the spread of disease.  Jesus tells His followers to not worry, for these things are all part of the master plan. He calms them; “Settle it therefore in your hearts not to meditate before what ye shall answer. For I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which all your adversaries shall not be able to gainsay nor resist… In your patience possess ye your souls.” (Luke 21:14-15,19) Jesus was basically saying that we don’t need to worry about what we need to do, because God will give us wisdom, to confound even our enemies. If we are patient, we will overcome.

Jesus continues to prophesy of the Last Days;

“…when ye shall see Jerusalem compassed with armies, then know that the desolation thereof is nigh… there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the starts; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and waves roaring; Men’s hearts failing them for fear… And then shall they see the Son of man coming in a cloud with power and great glory.” (Luke 21:20; 25-27)

                Right before the Second Coming of Jesus Christ, the world will show signs in the heavens, armies will fill the Middle East, the seas will be roaring and men’s hearts shall fail them as nations fall into distress. Then after all that, the world will see Jesus Christ return to the earth in His glory. Jesus advises His followers to “…pray always, that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things.” (Luke 21:36) Essentially, bad things will happen in the Last Days, but those who follow the Lord, follow
His commandments and pray always will escape the nightmares of the world in distress at His Second Coming.

Luke 20

Luke 20: Caesar and God

                Jesus is asked by what Authority He is able to perform the many miracles, Jesus then asks them; “The baptism of John, was it from heaven, or of men?” (Luke 20:4) And the people didn’t know how to answer, because if they said of men, then the people who believed and followed Jesus would get mad, because they thought of John as a prophet. They reasoned a bit more and thought that if they say it was from heaven, then Jesus would ask them why they don’t believe in His works. So after some time they tell Jesus that they cannot answer His question, and He responds; “…Neither tell I you by what authority I do these things.” (Luke 20:8)

                Jesus then tells of the Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen;

                “…A certain man planted a vineyard, and let it forth to husbandmen, and went into a far country for a long time. And at the season he sent a servant to the husbandmen, that they should give him of the fruit of the vineyard: but the husbandmen beat him, and sent him away empty.

And again he sent another servant: and they beat him also, and entreated him shamefully, and sent him away empty.

And again he sent a third: and they wounded him also, and cast him out. Then said the lord of the vineyard, What shall I do? I will send my beloved son: it may be they will reverence him when they see him.

But when the husbandmen saw him, they reasoned among themselves, saying, This is the heir: come, let us kill him, that the inheritance may be ours. So they cast him out of the vineyard, and killed him…” (Luke 20:9-15)

In this Parable, God creates the world and gives men to rule over it, but he sends servants (the Prophets) to check up on those who are entreated to protect and take care of the world and others. After several attempts, God sends His Only Begotten Son, Jesus Christ… but they too kill him. Jesus then asks those gathered, if the Son was killed, how much more of punishments will the Father give, when he returns?

Those gathered against Jesus, sought to kill Him, but feared the retaliation of His followers, so they left… but sent spies to watch Him.

Some, trying to tempt Jesus asked; “Is it lawful for us to give a tribute unto Cæsar, or no? But he perceived their craftiness, and said unto them, Why tempt ye me? Shew me a penny. Whose image and superscription hath it? They answered and said, Cæsar’s. And he said unto them, Render therefore unto Cæsar the things which be Cæsar’s, and unto God the things which be God’s.” (Luke 20:22-25)

The people marveled at His answer and kept their silence. Then one of the Sadducees came and tempted Jesus with questions of the Resurrection;  

“…Master, Moses wrote unto us, If any man’s brother die, having a wife, and he die without children, that his brother should take his wife, and raise up seed unto his brother.

                There were therefore seven brethren: and the first took a wife, and died without children. And the second took her to wife, and he died childless. And the third took her; and in like manner the seven also: and they left no children, and died. Last of all the woman died also. Therefore in the resurrection whose wife of them is she? for seven had her to wife.” (Luke 20:28-33)

Jesus answered them and taught about the Law of Marriage “…The children of this world marry, and are given in marriage: But they which shall be accounted worthy to obtain that world, and the resurrection from the dead, neither marry, nor are given in marriage: Neither can they die any more: for they are equal unto the angels; and are the children of God, being the children of the resurrection. Now that the dead are raised, even Moses shewed at the bush, when he calleth the Lord the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. For he is not a God of the dead, but of the living: for all live unto him.” (Luke 20:34-38)

Essentially in the next life Marriage would not be performed, but if the wife had married all the brothers, then God would sort those things out.

Luke 19

Luke 19: Jesus came to Save souls

                Jesus entered and passed through Jericho, and while there a man named Zachhaeus, who was chief among the publicans desired to see Him. Zaachaeus was a very wealthy man, but short and had to climb up a sycamore tree to get the attention of Jesus, otherwise he would have been hidden in the great crowd gathered for Jesus. While passing by the tree, Jesus tells Zaachaeus to come down, for He needed to use his house. Zaachaeus, being fearful of the Lord told Him that he had given half of his wealth to the needy and always gave 4x back to anyone who he wronged. Jesus tells him that he doesn’t need to worry about his sins, for He came to “…save that which was lost.” (Luke 19:10)

                Jesus then gives the Parable of the Pounds;

“…A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return… he called his ten servants, and delivered to them ten pounds, and said unto them, Occupy till I come. But his citizens hated him, and sent a message after him, saying, We will not have this man to reign over us… when he was returned, having received the kingdom…commanded these servants to be called unto him… that he might know how much every man had gained by trading. Then came the first, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained ten pounds. And he said… Well, thou good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities. And the second came, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained five pounds. And he said likewise to him, Be thou over five cities. And another came, saying, Lord. Behold, here is thy pound, which I have kept…” (Luke 19:12-20)

                All ten servants were given one pound each, the first made nine pounds and the second four pounds. The last servant made nothing, for he feared the man and did not want to lose the pound, so he did nothing with it. This Parable is similar to the Parable of the Talents, we should make the best out of our situation and never bury or hide something, we have endless opportunities and possibilities as mankind… make the best of it!

After telling the Parable, Jesus tells His Apostles to fetch Him a Colt that would be tied to door in a nearby village. So the Apostles go and grab the Colt, so that Jesus can ride it into Jerusalem. While in Jerusalem Jesus cleanses the Temple of evil, where the men have turned the house of prayer into “…a den of thieves.” (Luke 19:46)

Luke 15

Luke 15: The Lost Sheep

                Jesus gathers the Publicans and the sinners to hear Him, while the Pharisees and Scribes murmur that He is eating with sinners.

Jesus tells the Parable of the Lost Sheep;

“What man of you, having an hundred sheep, if he lose one of them, doth no leave the ninety and nine in the wilderness, and go after that which is lost, until he find it? And when he found it, he layeth it on his shoulders, rejoicing. And when he cometh home, he calleth together his friend and neighbours, saying unto them, Rejoice with me; for I have found my sheep which was lost. I say unto you, that likewise joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, more than over ninety and nine just persons, which need no repentance.” (Luke 15:4-7)

                Why is it important to rejoice over the Lost Sheep? Because you don’t want anyone to perish! We should have compassion on everyone! The other 99 sheep, why not worry about them? Well, they have not run away or slipped off the path from the rest. The 99 are just as important, but they are not in as much need as the ones who are Lost. Either way you should celebrate when someone or something has been found.

                Jesus tells the Parable of the Lost Coin (piece of silver);

“…what woman having ten pieces of silver, if she lose one piece doth not light a candle, and sweep the house, and seek diligently till she find it? And when she hath found it, she calleth her friends and her neighbours, saying, Rejoice with me; for I have found the piece which I lost. Likewise… there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth.” (Luke 15:8-10)

                This is the same thing as the Parable of the Lost Sheep, we should value everyone. If everyone is on the path and is not lost, great! However, those who have fallen off the path and are Lost, have need to be found!

Jesus tells the Parable of the Prodigal Son;

“…A certain man had two sons: And the younger of them said to his father, Father, give me of the portion of goods that falleth to me [inheritance]. And he divided unto them his living…the younger son gathered all together, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living [being rebellious and irresponsible]….when he spent all, there arose a mighty famine in that land: and he began to be in want… he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country; and he sent him into his fields to feed swine…. And when he came to himself, he said, How many hired servants of my father’s have bread enough and to spare, and I perish with hunger! I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee, And am no more worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.” (Luke 15:11-15;17-19)

So, this son goes to his father and asks for his inheritance now. The father agrees and the son wastes the money, and is forced to find employment with a man who apparently does not pay him enough to eat properly and he hungers. So he decides to return home to his father, where he plans on becoming one of the hired servants.

“And he arose, and came to his father. But when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and had compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him. And the son said unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in thy sight, and am no more worthy to be called thy son.” (Luke 15:20-21)

The son was embarrassed and told his father that he had sinned by wasting his money and that he was no longer worthy to be his son. But the father reacts in a rather unexpected manner…

“But the father said to his servants, Bring forth the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet: And bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it; and let us eat, and be merry: For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.” (Luke 15:22-23)

                Instead of scolding his son, the father was so happy to see him that he wanted to put on a huge feast in celebration of his return. The older son, when he hears about this is angered. So the father comes out to find the older brother to talk about why he was angry. The older son claims that he had worked hard, without transgression and yet the younger son sinned and wasted away the fathers money on all manner of sin. The father responds to the elder son; “… Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine. It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.” (Luke 15:31-32)

Essentially the father reminds the older son, that everything the father has is still his. He is not going to lose his inheritance, but that they should still celebrate the homecoming of the younger son. We need to remember this, that just because a sinner is being celebrated for getting back on the right path, does not mean that a good person who never sins doesn’t get a big feast. For that time will come!

Luke 14

Luke 14: Humility 

                Jesus goes into the home of the Chief Pharisee, to eat bread on the Sabbath day. There was a man who had dropsy; which was an old term for the swelling of soft tissue due to the accumulation of water. Today however, this might mean edema, due to congestive heart failure. Jesus heals the man and let him go. The Pharisees held their peace and did not say anything to Jesus for having cured the man on the Sabbath.  Even though the Pharisees held their peace, Jesus knew that they were questioning Him for having done this great miracle.

Even though none of them questioned Jesus, Jesus knew the desires of their hearts and asks them; “…Which of you shall have an ass or an ox fallen into a pit, and will not straightway pull him out on the sabbath day?” (Luke 14:5) Jesus then tells them that they should not sit down at a wedding in the highest room, without starting at the lowest. He explains that you want to start at the lowest place and have the host or someone more honorable than you to invite you to come to a higher room; “For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased [degraded or have your dignity or self-esteem lowered]; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.” (Luke 14:11) In other words Jesus is telling them that they should humble themselves and they will be lifted up and honored. But those who try and make themselves great will only be degraded and lowered. Moral of the story, be humble!

“…When thou makest a dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, neither thy kinsmen, nor thy rich neighbours… But when thou makest a feat, call the poor, the maimed, the lame and the blind: And thou shalt be blessed; for they cannot recompense thee: for thou shalt be recompensed at the resurrection of the just.” (Luke 14:12-14)

Jesus then puts forth a Parable of the Great Supper…

“…A certain man made a great supper, and bade many [he invited many]: And he sent his servant at supper time to say… all things are no ready. And they all with one consent began to make excuse [one by one they made excuses and left (18-20)]… that servant came, and shewed his lord these things. Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, Go out quickly into the streets… of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt [lame], and the blind… And the lord said unto the servant… none of those men which were bidden [invited] shall taste of my supper…” (Luke 14:16-24)

Jesus uses this Parable to explain, that those who are invited, that choose not to come unto the Lord will not taste of his supper. He says; “If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren and sisters, yea, and even his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.” (Luke 14:26) In order to follow Jesus Christ, we cannot have excuses, we must be able to follow Him at all times and sacrifice everything, if necessary for Him. Jesus says we must hate ourselves and everyone around us. What did He mean? He meant that we need to put Him first, then our families second. This does not mean that we don’t love our families, but we need to remember that God is Almighty, and He needs to be first in our lives.

For if we don’t put Him first we are like salt that has lost its flavor, if this be, what good are we?

Luke 13

Luke 13: Repent or Perish

Jesus tells us that the Galileans who were killed by Pilate at a sacrifice, or the eighteen people who were killed by a falling tower at Siloam, were not worse sinners than anyone else. He says; “…except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish.” (Luke 13:5)

He speaks of the Parable of the Fig Tree;

“…A certain man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came and sough fruit thereon, and found none. Then said he unto the dresser of his vineyard, Behold, these three years I come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and find non: cut it down…. he answering said unto him, Lord, let it alone this year also, till I shall dig about it, and dung it. And if it bear fruit, well: and if it not, then after that thou shalt cut it down.” (Luke 13:7-9) Essentially the certain man was God, and He was coming to remove any fruit that did not produce good fruit, while the dresser of the vineyard, Prophets, Apostles and other men on earth plead with the Lord to give that tree or person another year to produce good fruit. If it were not for the dressers of the vineyard, the bad plants would have been cut and burned.

While teaching in the Synagogue a woman who had a problem with her spine came in and was healed and straightened out by the Lord. The ruler of the synagogue was displeased by this action on the Sabbath, and Jesus responds; “…Thou hypocrite, doth not each one of you on the sabbath loose his ox or his ass from the stall, and lead him away to watering?” (Luke 13:15) The man was a complete hypocrite and did not allow for a woman to be healed, but could lead his animals to drink.

Jesus then explains that the kingdom of God is like a mustard seed, and leaven. The Mustard seed is the smallest of all the seeds, yet is one of the biggest when fully grown. We must strive to enter through the narrow gate to salvation, which will eventually be shut, causing wailing and gnashing of teeth, for Jesus will say; “… I know you not…” (Luke 13:27) Jesus laments for Jerusalem and its unwillingness, saying; “O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather he brood under her wings, and ye would not!” (Luke 13:34) 

Luke 12

Luke 12: Much is Given, Much is expected

                Jesus teaches to a multitude that is without number, so much so that they were on top of each other to gather closer to Jesus. He teaches that “…there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; neither hid that shall not be known.” (Luke 12:2) The Kingdom of God is not secret, but sacred. Those things that we do not understand now, we will understand later, for all things will one day be revealed.

Jesus explains that we should no fear physical death, nor fear those who can bring inflict that death upon us; “…Be not afraid of them that kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do… ye shall fear… him, which after he hath killed hath power to cast into hell…” (Luke 12:4) We should never fear the power of humans, for if someone wants to kill, that is all they can do. No one, besides God can “kill” us beyond physical death. We have no need to fear man, but only God.

Jesus then reminds His followers that they are precious in the eyes of God; “…even the very hairs on your head all are numbered. Fear not therefore…” (Luke 12:7) Those who follow God, and do not deny Him, the same shall not be denied before the angels of heaven. Jesus warns, that those “…that blasphemeth against the Holy Ghost… shall not be forgiven.” (Luke 12:10) But those who do follow the Holy Ghost do not need to fear before men; for unto him “…the Holy Ghost shall teach you in the same hour what ye ought to say.” (Luke 12:12)

                Jesus reminds the people that the animals (more specifically ravens/birds) of the world do not have storehouses, or farms. Yet “…God feedeth them: how much more are ye better than the fowls?” (Luke 12:24) Essentially, God love us, and we needed to be reminded of His love. Jesus also explains that we should not have a “…doubtful mind… your Father knoweth that ye have need of these things…. But rather seek ye the kingdom of God; and all these things shall be added unto you.” (Luke 12:29-31)

Jesus teaches those gathered that where “…much is given, of him shall be much required…” (Luke 12:48) If the Lord blesses us, we have an obligation to repay that debt. We will be called upon.  Jesus ends His speaking in the chapter in a very interesting way, He asks; “Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, Nay; but rather division.” (Luke 12:51) So if Jesus is not come to give peace, He is come to cause division? He explains that, YES, the Gospel of Jesus Christ will cause division; “…there shall be five in one house divided… The father shall be divided against the son…” (Luke 12:52-52) etc.

This division I find to be very interesting, especially in the current time. Look at the United States of America, and the division that has been caused over the past decade or so. The country is almost 50% divided on issues. A house, divided cannot stand. Jesus knew this, and was telling His Apostles and followers that this would be a sign of the end times.

Luke 10

Luke 10: The Seventy

“…the Lord appointed other seventy also, and sent them two and two before his face into every city and place…” (Luke 10:1)

Jesus then explains to the newly organized group of the ‘Seventy’ that the harvest is great, but the laborers are few. He tells them that he sends them as sheep, among the wolves. He gives them instruction to carry no money, and upon entering a house to say; “…Peace be to this house.” (Luke 10:5) and in whatever house a Seventy or Missionary should enter to “…eat such things as are set before you:” (Luke 10:8)

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints also has a Quorum of the Seventy, as shown in the below Organization of Christ’s Restored Church:

ldschurchstructure

Jesus tells them exactly what to say if a city rejects them…

“Even the very dust of your city, which cleaveth on us, we do wipe off against you: notwithstanding be ye sure of this, that the kingdom of God is come nigh unto you. But I say unto you, that it shall be more tolerable in that day for Sodom, than for that city. Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon, which have been done in you, they had a great while ago repented, sitting in sackcloth and ashes. But it shall be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon at the judgment, than for you. And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted to heaven, shalt be thrust down to hell.” (Luke 10:11-15)

Jesus tells the Seventy that those “…that heareth you heareth me: and he that despiseth you despiseth me…” (Luke 10:16) The Seventy shout for Joy at their new callings! They explain; “…even the devils are subject unto us through thy name.” (Luke 10:17) Jesus tells them to not rejoice because they have the power over devils, but rejoice because their names will be written in heaven. Jesus explains that He is happy that God the Father has “…hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes…” (Luke 10:21) Essentially Jesus is telling them, and the reader today that the things of the Gospel of Jesus Christ are not perceived by wisdom, but by the simple of understanding and knowledge; ‘babes’. Jesus tells the Seventy that they should be grateful for knowing the things they know, because many rulers have desired to know and see the things which they had witnessed.

A man among them, who was an attorney, asks Jesus what he should do to inherit eternal life. Jesus asks him how he interprets the writings and he explains to Jesus that all he needs to do is “…love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and all thy strength and with all thy mind; and thy neighbor as thyself.” (Luke 10:27) Jesus tells the man that he is correct, but the man then asks Jesus; “…who is my neighbor?” (Luke 10:29)

In response to the man’s question, Jesus tells the Parable of the Good Samaritan…

                “…A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves, which stripped him of his raiment [clothes], and wounded him, and departed leaving him half dead…. There came down a certain priest that way: and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the other side.” (Luke 10:30-32)

                So, there was a ‘certain man’, who we assume was Jewish, but may or may not have been Jewish, is robbed, beaten and left for dead. The road he was on was probably heavily traveled, so it is not surprising that two people had walked by him in a fairly short period of time. Although time is not mentioned, I personally believe that the events all took place within the same daylight. Both a priest and a Levite pass the man, forgetting the simple ‘love thy neighbor’.

Jesus continues the Parable; “But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him, And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him. And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee.” (Luke 10:33-35)

Good-Samaritan-Mormon

So, we learn that no matter what faith, gender or race we should show compassion on one another. Jesus asks the man who proposed the ‘who is my neighbor’ question, “Which now of these three, thinkest thou, was neighbor unto him that fell among thieves? And he said He that showed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go and do thou likewise.” (Luke 10:36-37)

The answer to the man’s question was easy, and the Parable of the Good Samaritan really hammers the message home. No matter who we are dealing with, even our enemies… when someone needs help we help!