Galatians 4

Galatians 4: Heirs of Christ

                Paul opens by explaining how a servant cannot inherit anything of their lord. However, because of the Abrahamic Covenant we all become adopted under the seed of Abraham. God sent His Son, so that we may be redeemed, for we “…were in bondage under the elements of the world:” (Galatians 4:3) Therefore Paul asks the Galatians; “…how turn ye again to the weak and beggearly elements, whereunto ye desire again to be in bondage?” (Galatians 4:9) The reason Paul asks this is because he clearly points out that all those adopted under the Abrahamic Covenant are “…no more a servant, but a son… [and] heir of God through Christ.” (Galatians 4:7)

                If we turn away from the worldly things and instead turn to Christ we can be made free from the misery of the world. We learn from Alma, a Book of Mormon Prophet who lived in Ancient America, that “…wickedness never was happiness.” (Alma 41:10; The Book of Mormon) Therefore those who choose to follow God and His commandments will be made free from the bondage of the evil that oppresses the earth.

Paul urges the Galatians to be like him and follow his example, as he follows the example of Christ. Paul then explains how Abraham had two sons, one was born of a bondwoman and the other was born of a freewoman. Ishmael was born of the flesh and unto a bondwoman, which represents the old covenant. Isaac was born of the spirit and unto a freewoman, which represents the new covenant. Those who do not follow the spirit, but rather follow the flesh shall not inherit the kingdom of God.

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Summary of the Old Testament

Summary of the Old Testament

The Old Testament is a collection of religious writings by the ancient Israelites that from the first section of the Holy Bible used by Christians throughout the world. One of the most popular versions of the Bible and the Old Testament section of the Bible is the “King James Version” which includes 39 books. These books are organized into a few different parts.

  • The Law
  • The History
  • The Poetry
  • The Prophets

The start of the Old Testament deals with the creation of the world, the creation of mans parents Adam and Eve and the flooding of the earth to cleanse from the wicked. The story tells of Abraham and his prophetic covenant between God. From Abraham came Isaac, then Jacob (whose name was changed to Israel), who had twelve sons, giving rise to the twelve “tribes” of Israel. One of Jacob’s sons, Joseph, was sold into slavery in Egypt, leading to Jacob and his family coming to Egypt and later their descendents becoming slaves in Egypt. Moses (about 1250 B.C.) led the Exodus (freeing of Israelites from bondage) from Egypt and the Covenant of God with the Hebrew nation was made.
God gave the people the Ten Commandments for the people of Israel to obey, accepting Him as their God. We learn that there were constant problems with the Jewish people believing in idols and other “gods.” This of course can be contrasted to modern day problems of people turning away from God and worship idols, such as money.

Finally the people reached the Promised Land and settled there after Moses’ death. “Judges” led the people until about 1000 B.C. when Kings were installed, yet these were still thought of as people doing God’s will. King David and King Solomon led a united, strong country — which became divided after Solomon’s death: Later we learn about the Israelites from their conquest of Canaan to their defeat and exile in Babylon. Even further into the Old Testament we learn of great wisdom in the forms of poetry and prophetic words. We learn about the questions of good and evil and the consequences of turning away from God. The Last Days before the Second Coming of Jesus Christ is examined and warned about through the prophets.

Finally we learn that in the end, God will restore his church and name a prophet in the Latter-days and through that prophet we would have the keys of the priesthood restored to the earth in order to seal families together for eternity!

Here is a list of Old Testament Stories:

Creation of the Universe Genesis 1:1-25
Creation of mankind Genesis 1:26-31
Adam formed Genesis 2:7-8
Eve made Genesis 2:20-25
Garden of Eden Genesis 3
Cain and Abel Genesis 4
Noah’s flood Genesis 6 to 8
God’s blessings and covenant with Noah Genesis 9:1-17
Tower of Babel Genesis 11:1-9
Abraham’s call Genesis 12:1-3
God’s covenant with Abraham Genesis 15
Destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah Genesis 18:16 to 19:29
Isaac’s birth Genesis 21:1-8
Sacrifice of Isaac (Abraham being tested) Genesis 22:1-19
Marriage of Isaac Genesis 24
Birth of Jacob and Esau Genesis 25:19-26
Esau sells his birthright to Jacob for food Genesis 25:27-34
Jacob and Rebekah’s deception of Isaac and Esau for Isaac’s blessing Genesis 27:1-40
Jacob’s ladder vision Genesis 28:10-22
Jacob’s wrestle with the angel and has his named changed to Israel Genesis 32:24-32
Israel’s (Jacob) trouble in the land Genesis 34, 35 and 37
Three burials: Deborah, Rachel and Isaac Genesis 35
Joseph’s coat, dreams and sold by his brothers for twenty pieces of silver Genesis 37
Israel (Jacob) blesses his twelve sons and then dies Genesis 49
Birth of Moses and found by Pharaoh’s daughter Exodus 2:1-10
Moses kills an Egyptian, goes to Midian and gets a wife Exodus 2:11-25
Burning bush – God speaks to Moses Exodus 3:1 to 4:17
Egypt’s nine plagues Exodus 7:14 to 10:29
Tenth plague against Egypt threatened Exodus 11
The Passover instituted Exodus 12:1-20
The Passover communicated Exodus 12:21-28
Tenth plague against Egypt inflicted Exodus 12:29-30
The Exodus – God’s deliverance of Israel Exodus 12:31-51
Crossing the Red sea Exodus 14
The Ten Commandments Exodus 20:1-17
Golden calf made by Aaron Exodus 32
Spies sent to Canaan Numbers 13:1 to 14:45
City of Jericho Joshua 6
Deborah and Barak Judges 4
Gideon Judges 6:1 to 8:35
Samson Judges 13:1 to 16:31
Samson and Delilah Judges 16:4-20
Ruth Ruth 1:1 to 4:22
Samuel’s birth I Samuel 1
Hannah’s (Samuel’s mom) prayer to the Lord I Samuel 2:1-10
David chosen by God I Samuel 16:1-13
David and Goliath I Samuel 17
David anointed king of Judah II Samuel 2:1-11
David anointed king of Israel II Samuel 5:1-12
David and Bathsheba II Samuel 11
God is displeased with David II Samuel 12:1-14
Solomon anointed king I Kings 1:28-40
God’s first appearance to Solomon I Kings 3:2-15
God’s second appearance to Solomon I Kings 9:1-9
Queen of Sheba I Kings 10:1-13
God is angry with Solomon I Kings 11
Elijah and the prophets of Baal I Kings 18:17-40
Elijah taken to heaven II Kings 2:1-11
Job afflicted by Satan Job 1:1 to 2:13
God speaks to Job Job 38:1 to 42:9
God blesses Job Job 42:10-13
Ezekiel’s vision of dry bones Ezekiel 37:1-14
Daniel and the kings food Daniel 1:1-16
Shadrach, Meshach and Abed-nego put in the fiery furnace Daniel 3
Daniel put in the lion’s den Daniel 6
Jonah in the belly of the fish Jonah 1:1 to 2:10

Genesis 25-27

Genesis 25-27

Chapter 25: Descendants of Abraham

Abraham gets married again and marries a woman named Keturah. With Keturah; they have 6 kids with their kids and grandkids:

  • Zimrain
  • Jokshan
    • Sheba
    • Dedan
      • Asshurim
      • Letushim
      • Leummim
      • Medan
      • Midian
        • Ephah
        • Epher
        • Hanoch
        • Abida
        • Eldaah
        • Ishbak
        •  Shuah

Abraham gave all that he had to his son Isaac, but unto his other children he gave a few gifts and sent them away. Abraham dies at the age of 175 (hundred threescore and fifteen years). His sons Isaac and Ishmael bury him in the cave of Machpelah, in the field of Ephron. This is the same cave that Abraham purchased to bury his wife Sarah. They bury them next to each other. Isaac was blessed by God. The generation of Ishmael is listed in chapter 25 of Genesis:

Ishmael, the son of Hagar (Sarah’s handmaid) and his sons:

  • Nebajoth
  • Kedar
  • Adbeel
  • Mibsam
  • Mishma
  • Dumah
  • Massa
  • Hadar
  • Tema
  • Jetur
  • Naphish
  • Kedemah

These are the 12 princes talked about in Genesis 17:20, which we have already read.

Generations of Isaac:

Isaac and Rebekah try to have children but are unable to do so. Rebekah inquires of the Lord and asks him why she is unable to have children. The Lord says unto her: “…Two nations are in thy womb, and two manner of people shall be separated from thy bowels; and the one people shall be stronger than the other people; and the elder shall serve the younger.” (Genesis 25:23)

Rebekah has twins, the first child came out red and called his name Esau and then Jacob was born shortly afterwards. Both of Isaac’s sons grew and one became a great hunter and the other was a plain man who enjoyed dwelling in tents. Isaac loved Esau because he was more of a manly man, and Rebekah loved Jacob, because he was at home with her more often.

  • Esau
  • Jacob

Jacob spends the day making some pottage (soup), when his older brother Esau comes in from the field and asks him for some food, because he was weak and tired.

Jacob promises to give his older brother some food, if he agrees to forfeit his birth right, Esau did not care about his birthright because he was hungry and agrees to give it to Jacob to feed his appetite.

Chapter 26: Prosperity of Isaac

The Lord appears unto Isaac and tells him that he is the God of his father and because he was a righteous man and Isaac was a righteous man that he would make his seed multiply as the stars of heaven and the whole earth will be blessed because of Isaac.

Isaac goes up and dwells in Gerar with his wife Rebekah, and when people of Gerar ask him about his wife he tells them that she is his sister. So, he must have learned this trick from his dad, because the same thing happens… except this time the king (king Abimelech) finds Isaac and Rebekah together and must question what they were doing, because he definitely thought they were something else besides brother and sister. Abimelech asks him why, and Isaac tells him because he was worried that someone would kill him and take his wife. So Abimelech tells everyone to not touch Rebekah or Isaac unless they want to die.

Isaac and his servants dig some wells and call them; Esek, Rehoboth, and Shebah. Esau (the son of Isaac) at the age of 40 marries Judith (the daughter of Beeri the Hittite) without the blessing of Isaac or Rebekah.

Chapter 27: Jacob is blessed.

Isaac is on his death bed when he asks his son Esau to go into the wilderness to get him some Venison that he might be able to enjoy one of his last meals, and in trade he promises to bless Esau. Esau agrees and heads out to hunt in the wilderness. Rebekah over hears this and commands Jacob to go get some goats, so she can make Isaac some meat and Jacob can bring it to his father (pretending to be Esau) and receive his blessing. Jacob brings in the meat to his father Isaac and when Isaac asks who he is, he tells them that he is Esau. Jacob receives Esau’s blessing from Isaac and when Esau returns with the Venison he is outraged that Jacob not only stole his birthright, but also his father’s blessing!

Genesis 22-24

Genesis 22-24

Chapter 22: Sacrifice of Abraham’s Son Isaac

God commands Abraham to take his son Isaac to the land of Moriah and “…offer him there for a burnt offering…” (Genesis 22:2)

                Abraham takes his son and they journey towards the mountain that the Lord had commanded him to go, but Abraham does not tell his son what the Lord had planned.  As they journey to the top of the mountain, Isaac even asks Abraham “…where is the lamb for the burnt offering?” (Genesis 22:7)

                Abraham tells Isaac that God will provide one for them, once they get to the top Abraham builds an altar and bound his son Isaac, Abraham takes a knife out and gets ready to kill his son… when an angel calls out to him and tells him “…lay not thine hand upon the lad, neither do thou any thing unto him; for now I know that thou fearest God…” (Genesis 22:12)

                So we learn that the whole thing was just a test to see if Abraham would listen and do as the Lord commands. But they notice a ram caught in a thicket.

God tells him, that because he did as the Lord commanded, that Abraham would be blessed with the seed as the number of stars and grains of sand, or in other words… A LOT!

Chapter 23: Sarah Dies

When Sarah (Abraham’s wife) was 177 years old she died. Abraham buys a cave for her to be buried in for four hundred shekels of silver.

Abraham buries his wife in the cave of the field of Machpelah before Mamre.

Chapter 24: Isaac’s Wife

Abraham commands Isaac to not marry a Canaanite, but instead commands his servant to go to Meopotamia into the city of Nahor.

Abraham tells the servant that when he comes across a lady who offers him and his camels water that she would be the one for Isaac. So the servant waits at a well and is offered water for him and his camels by a young fair virgin named; Rebekah.  The servant offers her a golden earing (1/2 shekel), two bracelets (10 shekels weight) of gold. She is impressed and takes them home, where he brother Laban is also impressed and invites the man into their home. The servant than explains what his business really is and the family and Rebekah accept and head back to meet Isaac.

When Rebekah and Isaac meet eyes, she jumps off her camel to meet him. They get married and Isaac is now comforted after the death of her mother.