Summary of Job

Summary of Job

Chapter by Chapter:

Job 1-2: Job, a Just and Perfect Man/Job is Smitten with Boils

Job 3-4: Job Curses his Birthday/Eliphaz Criticizes Job

Job 5-6: Happy is the Man that God Corrects/The Right Words

Job 7-8: What is our time on earth?/Our time on earth is short

Job 9-10: Man cannot contend with God/Why are we born?

Job 11-12: By searching we can find God/The souls of all things are in God’s hands

Job 13-14: I will trust the Lord/Shall man live again?

Job 15-16: The wicked do not believe/The witness is in heaven

Job 17-18: The body returns to dust/The wicked know not God

Job 19-20: In the flesh we will see God/The inheritance of Good and Evil

Job 21-22: The Wicked Sometimes Prosper in this Life/Eliphaz Accuses Job of Sinning

Job 23-24: After Trials, We are Refined/The Wicked Often Go Unpunished

Job 25-27: The Lowly State of Man/God and His Power are Great/Terrors of Death

Job 28-29: Wisdom Can Not be Bought/Job and His Former Prosperity

Job 30-31: Job Weeps for Those in Trouble/Job Invites Judgment from God

Job 32-33: Great Men are Not Always Wise/God Speak to Men in Dreams

Job 34-35: God Cannot Be Unjust/Men Should Trust in God

Job 36-37: The Wicked Die without Knowledge/God Controls Nature and Science

Job 38-39: Nature and God/Man Knows Nothing

Job 40-42: The Arm of God/All Things are God (The Body of God)

 

Scripture Thought (What I Learned):

We can learn a very simple, yet important lesson from the story of Job… bad things happen. I personally believe that EVERYTHING has a reason, bad or good. We learn from Job that EVERYTHING was taken from him, including a close encounter with his own life through sickness! Yet, Job prevailed and pushed through the challenges that God presented him… and because of it he became a stronger and more powerful man.

Sometimes we are burdened by challenges or trials in our lives. More often than not, we feel like we cannot carry the weight of these trials. But every trial or challenge that is presented to us, is unique to the individual and its end purpose is designed for that specific individual. When presented with a trial, you must ask yourself; WHY? What do I NEED to gain from this experience? There is a purpose for everything and in the end; for “…we know that all things work together for good to them that love God…” (Romans 8:28). If you are struggling, just know that you are NOT ALONE! Keep your head up and everything will work for the good!

Summary of Job:

The book of Job is one of the oldest books in the Bible, although we don’t know exactly how old the book is, there is no doubt that it is ancient. Some scholars believe that Job, is mentioned early on in the Bible in the book of Genesis as “Jobab” (Genesis 10:29), one of the sons of Joktan, which would put Job in the year between Noah and Abraham. In the opening chapter of the Book of Job, we learn that he is from the land of Uz, well there was a man named Huz (Uz?), who was Abraham’s nephew (see Genesis 22:21), perhaps the land of Uz was named after him?

Eliphaz (Job 2:11) was the son of Esau (Genesis 34:10-11); this son of Esau had another son named Teman (Genesis 36:10-11), and the descendants of Teman were known for their wisdom (Jeremiah 49:7). Bildad is called a Shuhite (Job 2:11), and Shuah was a son of Abraham through Keturah (Genesis 35:2).

Here is how the story of Job goes…

Job was a wealthy man living in a land called Uz with his large family and extensive flocks. He is “…perfect and upright, and one that feared God and eschewed (abstained from) evil” (Job1:1). One day Satan appears before God in heaven. God boasts to Satan about Job’s goodness, but Satan argues that Job is only good because God has blessed him abundantly. Satan challenges God that, if given permission to punish the man, Job will turn and curse God. God allows Satan to try Job and test this bold claim, but he forbids Satan to take Job’s life in the process.

In one day, Job receives four messages. Each message brought separate news that his livestock, servants, and ten children have all died due to invaders or natural catastrophes. Job rents (tears) his clothes and shaves his head, but he still blesses God in his prayers. Satan, presumably upset that his plan was thwarted appears in heaven again, and God grants him another chance to test Job. This time, Job is afflicted with horrible skin sores. His wife encourages him to curse God and to give up and die, but Job refuses, struggling to accept his circumstances.

Three of Job’s friends, Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar, come to visit him, sitting with Job in silence for seven days out of respect for his mourning. On the seventh day, Job speaks, beginning a conversation in which each of the four men shares their thoughts on Job’s afflictions, in long, poetic and berating way.

Job’s friends accuse him of being a sinner and not accepting the consequences of his sins. They don’t ever believe that Job had actual done nothing wrong to receive this kind of treatment. Because of this; Job curses the day he was born, comparing life and death to light and darkness. He wishes that his birth had been shrouded in darkness and longs to have never been born, feeling that light, or life, only intensifies his misery.

Job, slowly gets more and more upset with his so called friends that he calls them “…forgers of lies… physicians of no value.” (Job 13:4)

After trying to assert his blameless/innocent character, Job ponders man’s relationship to God. He wonders why God judges people by their actions if God can just as easily alter or forgive their behavior.

Job’s friends are offended that he attacks their wisdom. They still believe that Job actually deserves what has happened to him. Job continues to stay strong with his values and never loses his confidence of righteousness. Everyone however can only take so much berating, which proves true with Job, he grows sarcastic, impatient, and afraid. He cries about the injustice that God lets wicked people prosper while he and countless other innocent people suffer. Job wants to confront God and complain, but he cannot physically find God to do it.

Towards the end of Job Elihu, randomly shows up to add to the conversation. The young Elihu believes that Job has spent too much time and energy justifying himself rather than God. Elihu explains that God communicates with humans by two ways; visions and physical pain. Elihu elaborates by saying that physical suffering provides the sufferer with an opportunity to realize God’s love and forgiveness when he is well again.

Finally at the very end of the story, God shows up and interrupts Elihu. God calls for Job to be brave and answer His questions, which turn out to be rhetorical.  God describes many detailed aspects of his creation, praising especially his creation of two large beasts, the Behemoth and Leviathan. This was to prove how little man was compared to the power and wisdom of God.

Job admits that he is not perfect and that his knowledge and wisdom is nothing compared to the knowledge, wisdom and power of God. This answer pleases God, yet God gets upset with Job’s friends. Job, even after having been berated by his friends comes to their rescue and makes a case for them, God forgives them.

God returns Job’s health, providing him with twice as much property as before, new children, and an extremely long life. Job comes out victorious, because he kept with God the entire time!

Job 30-31

Job 30-31

Chapter 30: Job Weeps for Those in Trouble

At this point Job is pretty upset, men younger than him are mocking him, Job was tortured by the irony of it all. The sons of men whom Job would not even put with the dogs of his flock were now his mockers and critics.

Job was now low in the eyes of these worthless men. Job, continues again to describe his present crisis. He described the persistent, gnawing pains that were ever with him; but for him it was first a crisis of the soul.

Chapter 31: Job Invites Judgment from God

This chapter covers Job’s final answer to his friends and their arguments.

“Doth not he see my ways, and count all my steps? If I have walked with vanity, or if my foot hath hasted to deceit; Let me be weighed in an even balance, that God may know mine integrity. If my step hath turned out of the way, and mine heart walked after mine eyes, and if any blot hath cleaved to mind hands; Then let me sow, and let another eat; yea, let my offspring be rooted out” (Job 31:4-8)

Job says that he is not in the wrong… however, if he is infact in the wrong and he has walked in vanity, he says that he should be punished. Job did not want to lose his integrity before the Lord and therefore, essentially, said let me “reap what I sow”, don’t punish anyone but Job.

Job then continues to expound; “For destruction from God was a terror to me, and by reason of his highness I could not endure. If I have made gold my hope, or have said to the fine gold, Thou art my confidence;” (Job 31:23-24)

Here Job is saying that he was afraid of the Lord and did not put his trust in worldly, material things. This is a lesson we all must remember.

 

Job 28-29

Job 28-29

Chapter 28: Wisdom Can Not be bought

Job gives a  little discourse on Wisdom…. Job asks; “…where shall wisdom be found? And where is the place of understanding?” (Job 28:12)

Job tells us that Wisdom cannot be purchased with the vein things of the world. He says that; gold, silver, sapphires, gold of Ophir, coral, pearls, and topaz of Ethiopia cannot buy wisdom or knowledge.

He reminds his friends (and the reader) that “God understandeth the way thereof, and knoweth the place thereof” (Job 28:23), with God you can find Wisdom.

“…Behold, the fear of the Lord, that is wisdom; and to depart from evil is understanding.” (Job 28:28)

                If we refrain from evil, we will have understanding. If we fear the Lord (by following His commandments) we can find Wisdom.

Chapter 29: Job and His Former Prosperity

Job continues his discourse by telling his friends and the reader about his former days…

“Oh that I were as in months past, as in the ways when God preserved me; When his candle shined upon my head, and when by his light I walked through darkness” (Job 29:2-3)

It is clear that Job was longing for his old days, the days that were filled with joy instead of pain and suffering. He mentions that he lived a life of prosperity and greatness. Because of his many blessings, he reached out to those who were not so blessed…

“…I delivered the poor that cried…” (Job 29:12)

                “…I caused the widow’s heart to sing for joy.” (Job 29:13)

                “I was eyes to the blind, and feet was I to the lame” (Job 29:15)

Job reached out to his fellow man and helped those who could not help themselves, and lent a hand of help, love and service to those who were overwhelmed or tired.

Job even served justice when needed; “…I break the jaws of the wicked, and pluck the spoil out of his teeth.” (Job 29:17)

This to me says that violence, on occasion is OK. After all we can learn that EVEN Jesus had to cause a little disturbance at times… “And Jesus went into the temple of God… and overthrew the tables of the money-changers…” (Matthew 21:12)

Job 21-22

Job 21-22

Chapter 21: The Wicked Sometimes Prosper in this Life

Job begins his address to Zophar and his friends…

“Suffer me that I may speak; and after that I have spoken, mock on” (Job 21:3)

                Job goes on to explain that the wicked sometimes prosper in this life, Job’s crisis was fundamentally spiritual in nature, much more than being a medical crisis, an economic crisis, a social crisis, or a family crisis. His struggle was against God, and he wondered were God was in the midst of this very dark time.

Job speaks out about the wicked who prosper in this life; “They spend their days in wealth… Therefore they say unto God; depart from us; for we desire not the knowledge of thy ways. What is the Almighty, that we should serve him? And what profit should we have, if we pray unto him? (Job 21:13-15)

                Sometimes the wicked do prosper in this life, but with the judgment that will be waiting for them after this life. Job asks an important question; “Ho oft is the candle of the wicked put out…” (Job 21:17). In Job’s rhetorical question, he would answer “Not often enough.” And it would do Job no satisfaction to hear that the judgment would instead come upon the wicked man’s descendants.

Job acknowledged that wickedness was never ultimately rewarded and was always punished in the end. The problem for Job was that it never seemed soon enough that wicked would drink of the wrath of the Almighty. Job suffered in the now, and many of the wicked did not.

I can’t tell you how many times I have felt this exact way… why, if I am doing good, are those who are not seem to be rewarded? It is difficult to swallow at times, but God knows what is going on and will reward the just in His own time and way.

Chapter 22: Eliphaz Accuses Job of Sinning

This begins a third (and shortened) round of debate between Job and his three friends Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar.

Eliphaz begins by attacking Job’s character. Eliphaz essentially asks Job, “What good is he to God?” –  “Can a man be profitable unto God…” (Job 22:2)

Eliphaz heard all of Job’s anguished outpourings to God, and seemed to think that Job simply thought too highly of himself. He wondered why Job thought he was so special, so profitable to God and why he thought God owed him so much.

Eliphaz goes on to describe Job’s great wickedness.

“Will he reprove thee for fear of thee?” (Job 22:4) or essentially; “Is it because of your fear of Him that He corrects you?” Eliphaz pressed the point home to Job. Surely, the catastrophe that came upon Job (which Eliphaz lightly called a “correction”), did not come because Job feared God; it came because Job’s wickedness was great and his iniquity was without end.

Eliphaz goes on to insult Job’s intelligence, by asking him; “Is not God in the height of heaven?” (Job 22:12). Eliphaz instructed Job in the basics of theology, he thought that because Job would not admit his error, he must be fundamentally wrong in his understanding of God. So he begins with the basic idea of the might, majesty, and sovereignty of God.

Eliphaz, after having insulted the very wisdom and knowledge of Job, boldy asks him to; “Acquaint now thyself with him, and be at peace; there good shall come unto thee… If thou return to the Almighty, thou shalt be built up…” (Job 22:21-22). This was great advice for Job, assuming that the problem was sin in Job’s life. Yet we know (on the basis of Job 1-2) that this assumption was wrong, and therefore the advice was wrong.

 

Job 3-4

Job 3-4

Chapter 3: Job Curses his Birthday

Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his birth. And Job spoke, and said;

 “Let the day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said, There is a man child conceived. Let that day be darkness; let not God regard it from above, neither let the light shine upon it. Let darkness and the shadow of death stain it; let a cloud dwell upon it; let the blackness of the day terrify it. As for that night, let darkness seize upon it; let it not be joined unto the days of the year, let it not come into the number of the months. Lo, let that night be solitary, let no joyful voice come therein. Let them curse it that curse the day, who are ready to raise up their mourning. Let the stars of the twilight thereof be dark; let it look for light, but have none; neither let it see the dawning of the day: Because it shut not up the doors of my mother’s womb, nor hid sorrow from mine eyes. Why died I not from the womb? why did I not give up the ghost when I came out of the belly? Why did the knees prevent me? or why the breasts that I should suck? For now should I have lain still and been quiet, I should have slept: then had I been at rest, With kings and counsellors of the earth, which built desolate places for themselves; Or with princes that had gold, who filled their houses with silver: Or as an hidden untimely birth I had not been; as infants which never saw light. There the wicked cease from troubling; and there the weary be at rest. There the prisoners rest together; they hear not the voice of the oppressor.

The small and great are there; and the servant is free from his master. Wherefore is light given to him that is in misery, and life unto the bitter in soul; Which long for death, but it cometh not; and dig for it more than for hid treasures; Which rejoice exceedingly, and are glad, when they can find the grave? Why is light given to a man whose way is hid, and whom God hath hedged in? For my sighing cometh before I eat, and my roarings are poured out like the waters. For the thing which I greatly feared is come upon me, and that which I was afraid of is come unto me. I was not in safety, neither had I rest, neither was I quiet; yet trouble came.” (Job 3:3-26)

This chapter is very much a prayer to God from Job, where he asks; Why he couldn’t have died at birth and be spared from the pain and agony of his trial.

Chapter 4: Eliphaz Criticizes Job

This begins a long section in the Book of Job where Job’s friends counsel him and he answers them. His friends speak in more or less three rounds, with each speech followed by a reply from Job. At the end of these speeches, God answers Job and his friends and settles the matter.

Eliphaz the Temanite answered and said;

“If we assay to commune with thee, wilt thou be grieved? but who can withhold himself from speaking? Behold, thou hast instructed many, and thou hast strengthened the weak hands. Thy words have upholden him that was falling, and thou hast strengthened the feeble knees. But now it is come upon thee, and thou faintest; it toucheth thee, and thou art troubled. Is not this thy fear, thy confidence, thy hope, and the uprightness of thy ways? (Job 3:2-6)

Elpihaz is trying to help Job remember his own council that he had given when things were great for him.

“Remember, I pray thee, who ever perished, being innocent? or where were the righteous cut off? Even as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same. By the blast of God they perish, and by the breath of his nostrils are they consumed.  The roaring of the lion, and the voice of the fierce lion, and the teeth of the young lions, are broken. The old lion perisheth for lack of prey, and the stout lion’s whelps are scattered abroad.” (Job 3:7-11)

Eliphaz helps Job to understand, what he believes to be the source of Job’s troubles.

“Now a thing was secretly brought to me, and mine ear received a little thereof. In thoughts from the visions of the night, when deep sleep falleth on men, Fear came upon me, and trembling, which made all my bones to shake. Then a spirit passed before my face; the hair of my flesh stood up: It stood still, but I could not discern the form thereof: an image was before mine eyes, there was silence, and I heard a voice, saying” (Job 3:12-16)

A spirit comes to Eliphaz in the night. Here we can learn about the Holy Ghost, notice how it mentions how his hairs stood up, he couldn’t discern an image, and that the voice was still and silent. This is how the Holy Ghost communicates, not through yelling and screaming.

This is what the spirit said to Eliphaz:

“Shall mortal man be more just than God? shall a man be more pure than his maker? Behold, he put no trust in his servants; and his angels he charged with folly: How much less in them that dwell in houses of clay, whose foundation is in the dust, which are crushed before the moth? They are destroyed from morning to evening: they perish for ever without any regarding it. Doth not their excellency which is in them go away? they die, even without wisdom.” (Job 3:17-21)

Simple lesson to learn here, we are not perfect. It is not ok to sin, however you cannot completely avoid all sins. We are imperfect and it is ok to admit to your sins. Ask for forgiveness and move on.

Job 1-2

Job 1-2

                The book of Job is one of the oldest books in the Bible, although we don’t know exactly how old the book is, there is no doubt that it is ancient. Some scholars believe that Job, is mentioned early on in the Bible in the book of Genesis as “Jobab” (Genesis 10:29), one of the sons of Joktan, which would put Job in the ear between Noah and Abraham. In the opening chapter of the Book of Job, we learn that he is from the land of Uz, well there was a man named Huz (Uz?), who was Abraham’s nephew (see Genesis 22:21), perhaps the land of Uz was named after him?

Eliphaz (Job 2:11) was the son of Esau (Genesis 34:10-11); this son of Esau had another son named Teman (Genesis 36:10-11), and the descendants of Teman were known for their wisdom (Jeremiah 49:7). Bildad is called a Shuhite (Job 2:11), and Shuah was a son of Abraham through Keturah (Genesis 35:2).

Chapter 1: Job, a Just and Perfect Man

There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was blameless and upright, and one who feared God and shunned evil.  Job had seven sons and three daughters.

He also had an abundance of possessions (earthly and material).

  • Seven thousand sheep.
  • Three thousand camels
  • Five hundred yoke (yoke=pair) of oxen. (so in reality 1,000 oxen)
  • Five hundred female donkeys.

Job also had a very large household; he was the greatest man in the entire East. Although his sons would invite their sisters over for parties and this did not please the Lord and in His eyes they had sinned. The chapter does not say exactly what they did to sin, but it was bad enough that Job had to offer sacrifices to make up for the sin.

There was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan also came among them. And the Lord said to Satan, “…Whence comest thou?” (Job 1:7) So Satan answered the Lord and said, “…From going to and fro in the earth and from walking up and down it.” (Job 1:7). Then the Lord said to Satan, “…Hast thou considered my servant Job, that hence there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth (to keep from or forgo) evil” (Job 1:8) So Satan answered the Lord and said, “…Doth Job fear God for nought? Hast thou made an hedge about him, and about his house, and about all that he hath on ever side? Thou hast blessed the work of his hands, and his substance is increased in the land. But put forth thine hand now, and touch all that he hath, and he will curse thee to thy face.” (Job 1:9-11). The Lord then said to Satan, “Behold, all that he hath is in thy power; only upon himself put not forth thy  hand…” (Job 1:12). So Satan went out from the presence of the Lord.

Job’s Catastrophic Loss:

Now there was a day when his sons and daughters were eating and drinking wine in their oldest brother’s house; and a messenger came to Job and said, “…The oxen were plowing, and the asses feeding beside them: And the Sabeans fell upon them, and took them away; yea, they have slain the servants with the edge of the sword; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.” (Job 1:14-15)

While he was still speaking, another also came and said, “…The fire of God is fallen from heaven, and hath burned up the sheep, and the servants, and consumed them; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.” (Job 1:16)

While he was still speaking, another also came and said, “…The Chaldeans made out three bands, and fell upon the camels, and have carried them away, yea, and slain the servants with the edge of the sword; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.” (Job 1:17)

While he was still speaking, another also came and said, “…Thy sons and thy daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother’s house: And, behold, there came a great wind from the wilderness, and smote the four corners of the house, and it fell upon the young men, and they are dead; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.” (Job 1:18-19)

In the span, of what was probably only a few hours God allowed Satan to cause great destruction. I don’t know if Satan was the one controlling the weather or not, but if he was we can see that God can remove his hand or any restrictions he puts over Satan. God at any time can let Satan do his work, but God always has a purpose for it.

After hearing this, Job arose, tore his robe, and shaved his head; and he fell to the ground and worshiped. And he said:

“…Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return thither: the Lord gave, and the Lord hath takenaway; blessed be the name of the Lord.” (Job 1:21)

Even after all that had happened to Job, he did not sin nor charge God with wrong.

We must all look at life the way Job was able to immediately analyze and understand his situation. God gave us our lives; we came into this world with nothing, so everything he has is a blessing from the bounty of God. If God takes away something from us, and because of it we have less, it is still more than we came into this world with.

Joseph Smith went through something very similar…

While Joseph was held prisoner (with no charge or conviction) in Liberty, Missouri on March 20, 1839 he asked God;

“…where art thou? And where is the pavilion that covereth thy hiding place? How Long shall thy hand be stayed, and thine eye, yea thy pure eye, behold from the eternal heavens the wrongs of thy people and of they servants, and thine ear be penetrated with their cries? Yea, O Lord, how long shall they suffer the wrongs and unlawful oppressions, before thin heart shall be softened toward them, and thy bowels be moved with compassion toward them?” (Doctrine and Covenants 121:1-3)

Joseph Smith and the entire Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-days Saints were be persecuted mainly because of an order signed by Governor Lilburn Boggs of Missouri who issued “Executive Order 44”, also known as the “Extermination Order” which on October 27, 1838 read;

“…The Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated or driven from the state if necessary for the public peace…”

Joseph Smith received these words from God while being unlawfully detained for months and while the members of the LDS church were suffering;

“My son, peace be unto thy soul; thine adversity and thine afflictions shall be but a small moment; And then, if thou endure it well, God shall exalt thee on high; thou shalt triumph over all thy foes… Thou are not yet as Job; thy friends do not contend against thee, neither charge thee with transgression, as they did Job.” (Doctrine and Covenants 121:7-10)

Although we go through challenges in life, God always has a purpose for those challenges. We can learn from them and know that God is only doing it for our own good.

Chapter 2: Job is Smitten with Boils

Again there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan came also among them to present himself before the Lord, and the Lord said to Satan, “…From whence comest thou?” (Job 2:2) So Satan answered the Lord and said, “…From going to and fro in the earth and walking up and down it.” (Job 2:2)

Then the Lord said to Satan, “…Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil? and still he holdeth fast his integrity, although thou movedst me against him, to destroy him without cause.” (Job 2:3)

Satan answered the Lord and said, “…Skin for skin, yea, all that a man hath will he give for his life. But put forth thine hand now, and touch his bone and his flesh, and he will curse thee to thy face.” (Job 2:4-5) And the Lord said to Satan, “Behold, he is in thine hand; but save his life.” (Job 2:6)

At this point, Satan is essentially challenging God and telling him that Job still praised him because nothing was directly effecting him, just his family and his possessions. Here Satan suggests that if God were to curse him with an infirmity that he would not praise him. This was a new test Satan wanted to trouble God with, a physical one to prove to God that Job would no longer praise his name.

So Satan went out from the presence of the Lord, and struck Job with painful boils from the sole of his foot to the crown of his head. And he took for himself a potsherd with which to scrape himself while he sat in the midst of the ashes.

Job’s Great Physical Suffering:

                Later we can read other passages in the Book of Job that describe more of what he went through;

  • Intense pain; “My bones are pierced in me in the night season: and my sinews (A piece of tough fibrous tissue uniting muscle to bone or bone to bone; a tendon or ligament.) take no rest” (Job 30:17)
  • Peeling and darkened skin; “My skin is black upon me, and my bones are burned with heat” (Job 30:30)
  •  Pus-filled, erupting sores; “My flesh is clothed with worms and clods of dust; my skin is broken, and become loathsome.” (Job 7:5)
  •  Anorexia, emaciation; “My bone cleaveth to my skin and to my flesh, and I am escaped with the skin of my teeth” (Job 19:20)
  •  Depression; “I loathe it (talking about his life); I would not live always: let me alone…” (Job 7:16) “My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me. I went mourning without the sun: I stood up and cried in the congregation” (Job 30:27-28)
  • Weeping; “My face is foul with weeping, and eyelids is the shadow of death” (Job 16:16)
  • Sleeplessness and Nightmares; “The thou scarest me with dreams, and terrifies me through visions” (Job 7:14)
  • Putrid breath; “My breath is strange to my wife…” (Job 19:17)

The chapter continues… his wife said to him, “…Dost thou still retain thine integrity? Curse God, and die.” (Job 2:9) But he said to her, “…Thou speakest as one of the foolish women speaketh. What? Shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?” (Job 2:10) In all this Job did not sin with his lips.

Job’s wife, after losing her children and her wealth and most likely out of love tells Job to curse God! If Job were to curse God, then maybe God would strike him down and kill him. Because after all that Job had been going through and is going through at this moment, death would be a sweet release from the pain and suffering that God was putting him through.

When Job’s three friends heard of all this adversity that had come upon him, each one came from his own place; Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite. They had all come together to mourn with him, and to comfort him. However, when they raised their eyes from afar, they did not recognize him, they lifted their voices and wept; and each one tore his robe and sprinkled dust on his head toward heaven. So they sat down with him on the ground seven days and seven nights, and no one spoke a word to him, for they saw that his grief was very great.